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Portable Device Validation to Study the Relation between Motor Activity and Language: Verify the Embodiment Theory through Grip Force Modulation


Portable Device Validation to Study the Relation between Motor Activity and Language: Verify the Embodiment Theory through Grip Force Modulation
Authors : David Labrecque, Rémi Descheneaux-leroux, Alexandre Ariza Gomes De Castro, Victor Frak
Publication Date: 30-11-2016

Authors

Author(s):  David Labrecque, Rémi Descheneaux-leroux, Alexandre Ariza Gomes De Castro, Victor Frak

Published in:   International Journal of Engineering Research & Technology

License:  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Website: www.ijert.org

Volume/Issue:   Volume. 5 - Issue. 12 , December - 2016

e-ISSN:   2278-0181

 DOI:  http://dx.doi.org/10.17577/IJERTV5IS120003

Abstract

Studying the link between the motor function and the linguistic function has become increasingly popular over the past decade. Often, the subject is studied with the use of expensive devices (EEG, fIRM…) limited because they need a proper space. Following the studies of Frak & al. (2010), Aravena & al. (2012-2014) and Nazir & al. (2015), at CML (Cerveau, Motricité et Langage) laboratory, we developed a portable device that analyses the grip force modulation. This device provides us with the opportunity to put in place a developmental study with children in Canada and Brazil. We analyzed the grip force modulation of fourteen Canadian teenagers (Can.) and fifteen Brazilian teenagers (Bra.) after experiencing linguistic stimulation through the use of action words (e.g. grab) and non-action word (e.g. storm). The maturity of teenagers’ intraparietal area is similar to that of adults. Thus, we can compare our results with the those of Frak & al. (2010). The force modulations are analyzed using grip force sensors that are recording a variation in millinewton (mN) every millisecond (ms). Our choice in material and technic to normalize the data is based on our previous study concerning grip force sensors and linguistic stimulation. Our results show a superior modulation after listening to an action word compared to the non-action word in the two groups. We reproduce the results of Frak & al. (2010). The validation of the portable device could facilitate research by giving access to a both a larger and diverse population.

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